Friday, July 1
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"Recently I was walking to the park and, as I dropped the letter I was carrying into the mailbox, I was stilled by the notion, almost a prediction, that I would find a reindeer, a really tiny one, the size of, say, a lemon. This is the way the image came to me: it "popped in" (maybe fell? down from some nest?). Maybe the weather, a very cool June afternoon, encouraged the image's weird arrival. I attempted to exchange the reindeer for something more seasonal, more discernibly trinkety and likely to surface (clover, penny, bottle cap), but the reindeer was stubborn. It was meaning to be found.

I suppose I might dig around a bit, psyche-wise, and find the reindeer representing/standing in for something delicate and hidden, meaningful in some way I cannot yet understand.

Along the way there were white tulips so robust they reached to my waist. I saw some kind of evergreen whose uppermost branch shot out, like a hooked cane, into clear sky. Pink azaleas were dulling to brown and looked more like colonies of coral. And the place the reindeer sprang from, that swampy, rampant, tundral field, offered this image, too: a cleanly flensed frog. Now the two images were overlapping, the frog's empurpled and milky-blue, skinned legs - and the whole and intact tiny-frog-sized reindeer.

Then came the smell of gingerbread, though maybe I'm misidentifying some flower's perfume, and while this whole sensation/ eidolon/charm wasn't about winter at all, many wintry things kept adding up.

To what, though? To what?

I am of two minds about knowing.
What if I thought about the images differently: simply, that they exist. Are out there embedded in shifting forms, and enter me, the moment's site of odd happenings. No irritable reaching, just Hello, Reindeer. Hello, Frog. Your absolute smallness. Your unexplained blues. All fact and reason just let go of.

These images are meaningful/I have no idea what these images mean. And what do I get if I push these very real-but-odd pictures up against the nothing-in-hand?"
 - Lia Purpura









  • ". . . as I have said often enough, I write for myself in multiplicate,
    a not unfamiliar phenomenon on the horizon of shimmering deserts."
    - Vladimir Nabokov